Appetizers and Leftovers

When it comes to nature’s floral feast, buds are akin to appetizers: tiny bits of delectable beauty that whet our appetite for what’s to come. Here, a single coreopsis bud (Coreopsis basalis) gleams against the glow of bluebonnets and other coreopsis at the Rockport City Cemetery.

Even after a several-course meal, a bit of sweetness is nice. Here, a white prickly poppy, though reduced to stigma, stamens, and prickles, remains sweet enough to attract what appears to be a tiny tumbling flower beetle (Mordella sp.). The very opposite of the over-petaled example I’d seen near this spot, it attracted my eye, as well.

Comments always are welcome.

A First Glimpse of Spring

 

 

Which Texas wildflowers will bloom first, and when, varies from year to year. On March 7, bluebonnets (Lupinus texensis), the coreopsis known as golden wave (Coreopsis basalis), and phlox predominated in the Rockport City Cemetery: thick enough in some places to nearly cover the gravestones.

Despite cool winds and cloudy skies, they had that certain springlike glow about them, delighting both roaming photographers and roaming pollinators. Over the next days, I’ll show some of my favorites from my explorations: a few old friends, and a few new discoveries.

 

Comments always are welcome.
Click any image for greater size and more detail.

Golden Waves of Goldenwave

 

All along Texas’s Bluewater Highway, the coastal route from the west end of Galveston Island to the beach towns of Surfside and Quintana, summer is coming. Fields filled with goldenwave, or plains coreopsis (Coreopsis tinctoria), gleam in the sunlight: a worthy replacement for the masses of Indian paintbrush that have faded away.

 

Comments always are welcome.