Marking the First Day of Spring

Monthalia, Texas ~ Spring, 2019

Nothing says ‘spring’ in Texas like our bluebonnets, and they’ve been celebrating the turn toward this new season for some time. While everyone loves to see them overspreading the fields, it’s fun to find them hanging out with their friends as well. At the Rockport cemetery on March 7, several delightful pairings presented themselves.

Tucked among the Indian blankets (Gaillardia pulchella)
Backed by pink phlox (Phlox spp.)
Paired with woolly globe mallow (Sphaeralcea lindeimeri)
Complementing my favorite white prickly poppy (Argemone albiflora)

 

Comments always are welcome.
Click any image for greater size and more detail.

A Light in Spring

Detail of an early spring blue flag ~ Iris virginica

 

A Light exists in Spring
Not present on the Year
At any other period —
When March is scarcely here
A color stands abroad
On Solitary Fields
That Science cannot overtake
But Human Nature feels.
It waits upon the Lawn.
It shows the furthest Tree
Upon the furthest Slope you know
It almost speaks to you.
Then as Horizons step
Or Noons report away
Without the Formula of sound
It passes and we stay —
A quality of loss
Affecting our Content
As Trade had suddenly encroached
Upon a Sacrament.
                                       ~  Emily Dickinson

 

Comments always are welcome.
Photos can be enlarged by clicking on the image.

The First Iris of Spring

 

No, it isn’t the bearded iris, that sun-loving, hardy perennial beloved of gardeners, and it isn’t the familiar blue flag, a native, clump-forming iris that thrives in marshes, swamps, wet meadows, and ditches around the country.

This small and delicate beauty, known as blue-eyed grass (Sisyrinchium spp.), isn’t a grass at all, but another member of the iris family named for its grass-like leaves. At least a dozen Texas species exist; most show a typical yellow ‘eye,’ although the color of the flowers can range from blue, to purple, to rose and white. I suspect this one, found in a Brazoria county ditch, may be Sisyrinchium augustifolium.

Several clumps of these flowers were in full bloom on February 1, and I wasn’t the only one enjoying them. This little syrphid fly found the flower to be just his size: a perfect source of nectar and pollen.

 

Comments always are welcome.